yophotoman's journal of diy projects

**     Current Page:  6 Subip is managed by Kratos Websites: helping you win on the web   April 22nd 2019   **
on this website
Project Articles Laptop Icon
About This Site .................. pg 1
DIY Sailboat .................. pg 2
DIY Rowboat .................. pg 3
DIY Wood Shed .................. pg 4
Amateur Radio .................. pg 5
Radio Station .................. pg 6
Radio Clubs .................. pg 7
Christian Author .................. pg 8
Bible Websites .................. pg 9
The Iconclast .................. pg 10
Gardening .................. pg 11
Photography .................. pg 12
Writers Guild .................. pg 13
DIY Computers .................. pg 14
 
About & Contact Laptop Icon
Contact Form .................. pg 20
About The Author .................. pg 21
Donate To Projects .................. pg 22

Contact me with the contact form
or call Cell: 727-412-3603
(write first, your not on my contact list, so I probably won't answer unknown numbers)
KN4RBO Amateur Radio Station
DIY Ground Plane Antenna

KN4RBO is an FCC license that permits the holder to put a radio station on the air, to transmit to other amateur stations. When I was young, a station consisted of a receiver to listen with, a transmitter to send signals and a switch for antenna sharing between the two devices plus other boxes for special functions not built into the primary boxes. Today, most amateurs use radios where the receiver and transmitter are in the same box with a mulitude of functions, not the least is antenna switching. These are called 'transceivers' and represent the most common station setup. They are really no different from a hand held wakie-talkie except they are much larger and much more powerful. Car and truck amateur radios are somewhere inbetween for size and power. Minaturaization and computer technology is so pervasive in ham radio that most home station rigs are 12 volt, just like your car. Uh, never mind how ugly my home made antenna is (pictured)-- antennas are all ugly and mine worse than most.

Vintage Ham Station← We have
gone from this



To This →
Modern Ham Station

Modern manufacturing methods and digital technologies have changed what componants are used and even how large a space the ham's station occupies.

Hybrid Ham Station
SDR Radio on Linux

Pictured is a Software Defined Radio (SDR) being displayed on a computer monitor - just like your's. You buy a $30 USB box (dongle), with an included suction cup window mounted rabbit ears antenna plus some downloaded free software, and together these combine to turn your computer into a radio receiver/scanner with a visual display of a wide swath of radio frequencies - all at once. Some hams use it as their primary receiver or a "panadapter," so they can monitor all the local traffic at once. If you add a transceiver and an automatic antenna switch, you have a hybrid ham station. The whole station can amount to a laptop, and a couple of small boxes - powered by 12 volt battery under the table. A complete ham station which used to cost over $2,000 thirty years ago, can now be acquired for under $200 (without the computer of course) And it does not even need to be spent all at once. Technology has really changed how we do things! (of course you can spend a lot if you want to 😀)

SDR Radio on Linux

SDR Radio on Linux
The Baofeng Chinese handie talkie (HT) pictured (right) retails often for less than $25.00 USD. As a hand held, it's a complete radio station.



The same company also makes a companion power amplifier which handles all the switching between receive and transmit, including antenna switching. The power amplifier boost the signal from 5 weatts to over 25 watts. Amplifier, walkie talkie, outdoor stationary antenna and accessories can be had at Amazon for under $180 USD, well within the budget of us cheap hams. It's a basis of my personal "ham shack" as you can see, (left) sitting on the right of the monitor, at the base of the desk lamp, in it's own charging station. Yes, it's really that small. The computer screen is displaying the middle portion of what is called the "2 Meter Band." This representation of the spectrum is called a "waterfall" display.