yophotoman's journal of diy projects

**     Current Page:  5 Subip is managed by Kratos Websites: helping you win on the web   February 17th 2019   **
on this website
Project Articles Laptop Icon
About This Site .................. pg 1
DIY Sailboat .................. pg 2
DIY Rowboat .................. pg 3
DIY Wood Shed .................. pg 4
Amateur Radio .................. pg 5
Radio Station .................. pg 6
Radio Clubs .................. pg 7
Christian Author .................. pg 8
Bible Websites .................. pg 9
The Iconclast .................. pg 10
Gardening .................. pg 11
Photography .................. pg 12
Writers Guild .................. pg 13
DIY Computers .................. pg 14
 
About & Contact Laptop Icon
Contact Form .................. pg 20
About The Author .................. pg 21

Contact me with the contact form
or call Cell: 727-412-3603
(write first, your not on my contact list, so I probably won't answer unknown numbers)
Radio Amateur Call Sign "KN4RBO"

Broadcast Antenna

According to the NATO standard phonetics, my amateur radio call sign, KN4RBO, is:
"Kilo Nobember Four Romeo Bravo Oscar"

Radio Amateurs (aka HAMS) have a long and rich history of pushing the boundries of communication using radio, often by building their own power supplies, radio recievers, transmitters and antennas and/or coverting commercial or military radios for amateur use. These days of miniaturization and robotic manufacturing, building your own is mostly relegated to antennas. However, how amateurs assemble devices into a radio station is unique to each licensee.

Today, modern radio amateurs explore global signal propgation with GEO location mapping websites, bounce signals off the moon, asteroids and even the aura boralis. They even communicate with their own satellites and the International Space Station (ISS). Amateurs are connecting through the Internet with transceivers linked in networks to allow what used to be local contacts to extend across the globe. The nature of communications has so drastically changed that the FCC broke with a century of tradition and dropped the Morse Code requirement for amateur licensing in 2007!

How Radio Has Changed
WW II Radio AR-3 Heathkit Receiver

Way back, when I was a teenager, radio amateurs often used military surplus radios or parts from them to assemble ham stations such as this BC-348 reciever pictured (left image), I still own it & it works. These days, not only is equipment miniaturized but their abilities are enhanced beyond anything we would have thought of in the 50's or 60's and cannot hand build in a garage. Today, an amateur radio station often includes integrating a computer into the setup.

As a teenager, I did a bit of DIY radio by assembling a Heath Kit AR-3 general coverage reciever (right image). It was a tube radio and you had to solder point to point every connection (no printed circut board) following an instruction manual. It worked first time, no mistakes. Dad was shocked.

What is ahead for KN4RBO

Baofeng Wakie TalkieThe amateur radio license,KN4RBO, is fresh, ink hardly dry on the official papers. The license is a "Technician" so my radio privileges are limited to mostly Very High Freqency (VHF) and UHF. Like many other new Techs, I bought a cheap Chinese imported hand held walkie-talkie. Now I'm making my own VHF antennas. Look for updates on the DIY Radio Station page for Youtube playlist and other links to radio projects when they're available.